PRIMARY SOURCES

  • Our local organization for home remodel and design is the NW EcoBuilding Guild. See the web site for your nearest Chapter, Public Talks, Workshops, and the Green Pages online for ecologically-minded designers, contractors and suppliers.

  • A great resource and compliment to the Not-So-Big-House books by Sarah Susanka is her website.
  • The grand-daddy of the Not-So-Big approach is the Pattern Language developed by Christopher Alexander. For details of his innovative approach, go to his site
  • Learn more about forest-friendly lumber at the Audubon special site. See my link under Retailers/Designers.
  • Energy Savings: download the Home Energy Briefs (E04-11 through E04-14) from the Rocky Mountain Institute. They are a great non-partisan think tank working on "Winning the Oil Endgame." They coauthored the seminal book: Natural Capitalism, and wrote Re-Inventing Fire. See more at Rocky Mountain Institute.
  • Another energy savings site that is more local is from WSU: Extension Energy Program. See their Energy Library for more links.

SEATTLE/NW RESOURCES - SERVICES - EDUCATION

  • Recycled items for your home and remodel can be found at a few different places: Check out Second UseEarthwise Salvage and Ballard Reuse.

  • Education for the homeowner is important. A great source of a variety of classes for the homeowner are offered at the Phinney Neighborhood Center. Watch for my classes from time to time.

  • Another interesting resource is the Lighting Design Lab. The lobby and public areas are designed as an open classroom. You can see many types of lighting, all labeled and explained..

  • Sick building syndrome? Multiple chemical sensitivity? You can find specialists to help you with these issue, including EHS-International.

PERSONAL INSPIRATION

  • For the deepest green of all, take a few minutes off and meditate. Support is available at your local Shambhala Meditation Center. They are good people who offer free instruction in an open setting. Take a restorative break at the national Shambhala website. Some people connect deeply with buddhist nun Pema Chodron: see her books here.